Seattle police officers saved a man's life by using CPR and giving him a dose of nasal naloxone. The man was overdosing on heroin. This is the 17th time its officer have saved someone's life using the drug since they started carrying it in March. McClatchy Seattle Police Department
Seattle police officers saved a man's life by using CPR and giving him a dose of nasal naloxone. The man was overdosing on heroin. This is the 17th time its officer have saved someone's life using the drug since they started carrying it in March. McClatchy Seattle Police Department

National

Dad was using heroin in the bed where his kids slept – and his baby OD’ed, police say

December 07, 2017 11:14 AM

A father in New York City is facing criminal charges after he admitted to police that he was using heroin in the bed where his 1-year-old daughter and 2-year-old son were sleeping, WPIX reported.

Edgardo Rodriguez, a 20-year-old Bronx resident, and his mother woke up early Saturday and realized the 1-year-old girl wasn’t breathing, ABC News reported. The baby girl was unresponsive by the time they got to the hospital.

She was given Naloxone and Narcan, opiate antidotes that reverse the effects of overdose, ABC News reported.

Rodriguez told police that he was using heroin before his kids laid down and “some of it spilled,” before he went to sleep, according to court documents obtained by WPIX News.

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"I don't know how my daughter got in contact with the residue on the bed because I was high," he told police.

Police found white powder substance on the bed where the two kids slept and more than one gram of heroin on Rodriguez, the New York Daily News reported.

On Saturday, Rodriguez was arrested and charged with reckless endangerment, criminal possession of a controlled substance and endangering the welfare of a child, according to online court documents.

Days later, another 1-year-old girl in the Bronx overdosed on heroin, the New York Daily News reported. Her parents told police they saw their daughter with a plastic bag in her mouth when she was in her stroller. She was rushed to the hospital and treated with Naloxone. No charges have been filed in that case.

Children and babies accidentally exposed to heroin and fentanyl is becoming more and more common in the United States, according to recent statistics from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. A baby suffering from opioid withdrawal is born every 25 minutes in the United States.

In July, a 10-year-old Miami boy died with fentanyl in his system hours after he visited a public swimming pool, according to the Miami Herald. CNN and NBC both reported that it was suspected the boy died from touching fentanyl. But later, experts said it was “highly unlikely” given the timeline of how quickly he became sick and died.

From 2016 to 2017, more than 20,000 people in the U.S. died from fentanyl and other synthetic opioids, which was double the amount of deaths from 2015 to 2016, according to the CDC.